Catholic Conference of Ohio
Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Issues - Catholic Conference of Ohio

News

Statewide Catholic Rural Life Dialogue

The Vocation of Agriculture: to Till and Keep God's Creation

Saturday, March 25, 2017
St. Joseph Church, Parish Activity Center

670 W. Main St., Plain City, Ohio
10 am – 3 pm

We invite you to a day of dialogue and prayer regarding the vocation of agriculture.  Join with other Catholics throughout Ohio as we explore the many blessings and challenges that face rural workers, rural parishes and rural communities.

Please click on the link below for more information and to register for this free event.

Let Lawmakers Know Your Support for Immigrants and Refugees

USCCB's Justice for Immigrants Issues Action Alert

Background: 
President Donald Trump has issued an Executive Order that has devastating impacts on refugee resettlement in the United States. The Executive Order:

  • Halts the entire refugee admissions program for 120 days to determine additional security vetting procedures;
  • Cuts the number of refugees admitted in FY 2017 from 110,000 to 50,000;
  • Suspends resettlement of refugees from Syria;
  • Suspends the issuance of visas to individuals from countries of concern, including Syria, Iraq, Iran and other countries.

The U.S. refugee resettlement program is a life-saving program for the most vulnerable of the world's refugees. Welcoming people fleeing violence and conflict in various regions of the world is part of our identity as Catholics. We seek to protect the vulnerable and recognize the human dignity of all. Moreover, when the United States through its resettlement program shares responsibility with refugee host countries, it helps the refugees, supports the countries, and helps to enhance peace, security, and stability to sensitive regions in the world. Today, with more than 65 million people forcibly displaced from their homes, the need for the U.S. to show leadership in welcoming refugees and provide freedom from persecution is more urgent than ever.

Refugees who come through the program go through a rigorous, extensive vetting process. The Executive Order halts the arrival of refugees for at least 120 days, including those who have already gone through up to two years of vetting. This will affect some families already in transit. Standing up for refugees and for the life-saving resettlement program is consistent with our values as Americans and as Catholics.

Contact Form

USCCB Committee On Migration Chair Responds To Trump Administration Sanctuary City Executive Order

Order could be injurious to local relationships between communities and law enforcement where building trust and supportive relations with immigrant communities is essential to reducing crime and helping victims

Bishop Joe S. Vásquez of Austin, Texas and chairman of the U.S. Bishops' Committee on Migration has issued the following statement in response to the executive order that would deny federal funding for jurisdictions that choose not to cooperate with federal efforts to deport undocumented immigrants:

I share the concern that all of us feel when someone is victimized by crime, especially when the perpetrator of that crime is someone who is in the United States without authorization. I urge our local, state, and federal elected officials to work together in a bipartisan manner to ensure that all persons — U.S citizens and newcomers alike — are protected from individuals who pose a threat to national security or public safety. I am concerned, however, by the Executive Order issued by the President on January 25, 2017. This order would force all jurisdictions to accept a one-size-fits-all regime that might not be best for their particular jurisdictions.  

We believe in the inherent value of subsidiarity, and as spiritual leaders who minister to and live every day in our communities, we recognize the importance of relationships between local law enforcement and the people of the communities that they police. My brother bishops and I work to engage both local law enforcement and immigrant communities and help to foster dialogue between the two. We know that cooperative relationships between law enforcement and immigrant communities are vital. I fear that this Executive Order may be injurious to that vital necessity.

I have enormous respect for and value our federal law enforcement agents who risk their lives every day to enforce our immigration laws. I also recognize that there may well be situations where local government feel they need to foster a relationship with their communities by working with the victims of or witnesses to crime without instilling a fear that by coming forward, they or their family members will be handed over to immigration authorities.  

As Archbishop Cordileone eloquently wrote in July of 2015 when confronted by tragedy in the Archdiocese of San Francisco, "Over the long-term, and in conjunction with my fellow bishops, I call upon Congress and the Administration to work together to comprehensively repair our nation's flawed immigration system, a system that divides families and undermines human dignity. Such reform, long overdue, should preserve family unity, ensure the due process of law, protect those fleeing persecution, and ensure the integrity of our nation's borders."

USCCB Chairman Strongly Opposes Executive Order Because It Harms Vulnerable Refugee and Immigrant Families

U.S. Catholic Bishops will redouble their support for, and efforts to protect, all who flee persecution and violence

Bishop Joe S. Vásquez of Austin, Texas, chairman of the Committee on Migration, stated:

“We strongly disagree with the Executive Order’s halting refugee admissions. We believe that now more than ever, welcoming newcomers and refugees is an act of love and hope. We will continue to engage the new administration, as we have all administrations for the duration of the current refugee program, now almost forty years. We will work vigorously to ensure that refugees are humanely welcomed in collaboration with Catholic Charities without sacrificing our security or our core values as Americans, and to ensure that families may be reunified with their loved ones.”

“The United States has long provided leadership in resettling refugees. We believe in assisting all those who are vulnerable and fleeing persecution, regardless of their religion.   This includes Christians, as well as Yazidis and Shia Muslims from Syria, Rohingyas from Burma, and other religious minorities. However, we need to protect all our brothers and sisters of all faiths, including Muslims, who have lost family, home, and country. They are children of God and are entitled to be treated with human dignity. We believe that by helping to resettle the most vulnerable, we are living out our Christian faith as Jesus has challenged us to do.”

“Today, more than 65 million people around the world are forcibly displaced from their homes. Given this extraordinary level of suffering, the U.S. Catholic Bishops will redouble their support for, and efforts to protect, all who flee persecution and violence, as just one part of the perennial and global work of the Church in this area of concern.”

Full Statement

Catholic Social Teaching on Immigration

Support Urged for the Federal BRIDGE Act to Protect Immigrant Children

USCCB, CHA Encourage emails to Congress


The BRIDGE (Bar Removal of Individuals who Dream and Grow our Economy) Act, S.128/H.R. 496, was recently introduced in Congress as a bipartisan effort to sustain the temporary relief from deportation and employment eligibility offered to youth through the Department of Homeland Security's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Under the BRIDGE Act, young people who came to the United States as children would maintain their eligibility to work and live in the U.S. without the fear of deportation and family separation so long as they meet certain requirements, such as showing a commitment to education or honorable service in our military and having no history of serious crime.

Email your U.S. Representative and Senators

Federal Judge Rejects Ohio's Execution Procedures

Judge Michael Merz delays three upcoming executions

Following a week-long hearing, Judge Merz rejected the lethal injection of a sedative called midazolam. It was used in problematic executions in Arizona and Ohio. The judge also barred the state from using drugs that paralyze inmates and stop their hearts.

Ohioans to Stop Executions

Catholic Mobilizing Network to End the Use of the Death Penalty

Committee On Migration Chair Strongly Opposes Administration’s Announcement To Build A Wall At U.S.-Mexico Border, Increase Detention And Deportation Forces

Catholic Church will continue to support and stand in solidarity with immigrant families

Bishop Joe Vasquez, Chair of the Committee of Migration and Bishop of the Diocese of Austin, stated:

"I am disheartened that the President has prioritized building a wall on our border with Mexico. This action will put immigrant lives needlessly in harm's way. Construction of such a wall will only make migrants, especially vulnerable women and children, more susceptible to traffickers and smugglers. Additionally, the construction of such a wall destabilizes the many vibrant and beautifully interconnected communities that live peacefully along the border. Instead of building walls, at this time, my brother bishops and I will continue to follow the example of Pope Francis. We will "look to build bridges between people, bridges that allow us to break down the walls of exclusion and exploitation.'"

"The announced increase in immigrant detention space and immigration enforcement activities is alarming. It will tear families apart and spark fear and panic in communities. While we respect the right of our federal government to control our borders and ensure security for all Americans, we do not believe that a large scale escalation of immigrant detention and intensive increased use of enforcement in immigrant communities is the way to achieve those goals. Instead, we remain firm in our commitment to comprehensive, compassionate, and common-sense reform. We fear that the policies announced today will make it much more difficult for the vulnerable to access protection in our country. Everyday my brother bishops and I witness the harmful effects of immigrant detention in our ministries. We experience the pain of severed families that struggle to maintain a semblance of normal family life. We see traumatized children in our schools and in our churches. The policies announced today will only further upend immigrant families."

"We will continue to support and stand in solidarity with immigrant families. We remind our communities and our nation that these families have intrinsic value as children of God. And to all those impacted by today's decision, we are here to walk with you and accompany you on this journey."

Full Statement

USCCB Migration & Refugee Services Information

2016 Human Trafficking Commission: Annual Report

Ohio Attorney General's Office issues new report

By increasing communication between local coalitions and federal and state agencies, the commission will continue to identify the available services for survivors of human trafficking and make the local community response stronger. The next year will bring more opportunities to increase education and outreach across the state. Members will be speaking to new organizations and emphasizing the importance of identification and the collection of tips. Local advocates, service providers, law enforcement, and other professionals will continue to play an essential role in fighting human trafficking. 

Full Report

Ending the Death Penalty Urged by Ohio Bishop

Bishop Thomas, Diocese of Toledo/Cleveland, issues statement

Bishop Thomas urges all Catholics and people of good will to take the following steps:

  •  pray for the victims of crime, those facing execution, and those working in the criminal justice system;
  • reach out to the families of those affected by violent crime by bringing Christ's love and compassion;
  • learn about the Church's teaching on capital punishment and educate others in this vital area of concern;
  • advocate for the end of the death penalty by contacting Governor John Kasich to urge clemency for all 139 individuals on death row in the State of Ohio.

 

Pope Francis Names Bishop Daniel E. Thomas As Apostolic Administrator of The Diocese of Cleveland

The Holy Father, Pope Francis, named the Most Reverend Daniel E. Thomas as Apostolic Administrator of the Diocese of Cleveland in addition to his responsibilities as the Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Toledo.  This appointment accompanied Pope Francis’ acceptance of the resignation of the Most Reverend Richard G. Lennon for health reasons.  Bishop Thomas has served as the Bishop of Toledo since 22 October 2014 and will continue in this office as he also serves the Diocese of Cleveland.

Statement of Bishop Daniel E. Thomas

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